Friday, 4 March 2016

Shawl collar blouse

Over the last few weeks I've fallen down a blouse/collar drafting rabbit hole.  As much as I love my dresses, I have lots of skirts, and fancy wearing something other that a jersey top with them (although I am wondering what I'd do without my Agnes pattern!).

Ages ago I spotted this gorgeous blouse by Zoe, and it stuck in my head because I really loved the collar.  I finally got around to trying to replicate it, and here is the result.

This turned out to be a bit difficult to photograph, and the weather hasn't helped lately.  I think this was from the third lot of photos that I took.

I'm calling this a wearable toile, because the fabric isn't really right for the style.  It's some cotton poplin that I got over a year ago in Craftswoman Fabrics in Carrickfergus.  It was the end of a bolt and I had planned to make some pyjama bottoms with it, so it wasn't going to be a disaster if the blouse didn't work out.




I drafted this from my block.  The front has a bust dart, and waist darts.  I narrowed the waist darts by 1/4" on each dart leg on the front and back to make the fit a bit looser.  I should have added a bit to the side seams on the hips, but have done this on the next blouse I've made.

 

I am delighted with how the collar turned out.  I drafted it from the Craftsy class "Patternmaking Design: Collars and Closures".  I absolutely love these Craftsy patternmaking classes, they are so easy to follow.  And I'm not saying that because I have anything to do with Craftsy, because I don't; I just think they're great classes, and have bought them myself.  Although I think it's always worth waiting for a Craftsy sale on classes.

 

 

This collar is from the Shawl Collar class.  There are two different types of shawl collar in the class, a full stand and a partial stand.  The difference seems to be the height of the stand - the bit that sits against the back of the neck.  I originally drafted the full stand collar, and made a toile, but felt that it sat too high on the back of my neck.

So then I drafted the partial stand collar.  The stand is shorter, and then a section is added into the width of the collar at the shoulder, I'm guessing that this is to allow for the shorter collar height.

 

The upper collar is cut on the straight grain of the fabric, and the under collar is cut on the bias.

 

Below is my collar draft which doesn't have a seam allowance.  The horizontal line at the bottom (just above 9 1/4) is a guideline.  The slightly curved line above it is the neckline edge.  It is curved instead of straight to give a softer look.  The Roll Line is the bit where the collar folds over on itself.



The blue shaded area is the bit that is inserted at the shoulder - the little black triangle on the neckline is the shoulder point which lines up with the shoulder seam.  The black arrowed  lines are the grainlines for the collar and under collar.  Everything to the top right is the shape of the front edge of the collar, and this is the bit where you can go crazy.

You can see that I was so pleased with it that I lost the ability to spell both "partial" and "shawl"!!

The armholes are finished with bias tape which I made using a bias tape maker.  This was much easier to do that I thought.

 

If you like the idea of this blouse, but don't what to draft it yourself, I recently stubbled upon New Look 6598 while looking for something else entirely, and thought it looks quite similar.

http://www.simplicitynewlook.com/new-look-patterns/6598/#.VsmZhUD56YK

 

I love how it turned out, even if I did put far to many buttons on it!  Just because I have the buttons doesn't mean I have to use them...  And I am going to make another version using some lovely fabric that came from my Granny.    

Have a great weekend,

Lynne 

13 comments:

  1. That's lovely; the shape and the fabric print :) You're very clever.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm delighted with how it turned out.

      Delete
  2. Hi Lynne, great phrase "collar drafting rabbit hole"! Have a fun weekend x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks!! Today I have branched off down the convertible collar tunnel...

      Delete
  3. I love the fabric, so pretty, it's the kind of print I would choose for myself! It suits you perfectly!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! The fabric is by Rose and Hubble, it doesn't have a print name though.

      Delete
  4. Take a look at McCalls M6750 - same sort of collar but has 12 (!) darts for fit and shape.
    It looks like you've made a perfectly wearable muslin and great with your jeans.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I looked at the McCall's pattern and, good grief, 12 darts! It's lovely, but 12 darts!!

      Delete
  5. It looks like a very wearable toile to me! I know what you mean about needing tops - my default sewing option is always dresses, but I have some lovely skirts that get a bit neglected because all my RTW tops are wearing out. I've just treated myself to Sew Over It's new blouse pattern to try to rectify that!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm with you on the dresses, but have a few neglected skirts too. The new Sew Over It blouse is lovely. I really liked the long sleeves, and might try something like them on the blouse I'm making now. Good luck with your blouse.

      Delete
  6. cute! I have that new look blouse on my pattern want list ;o) Your version looks fab and I love the buttons you picked for it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I only found the New Look pattern after I'd finished my blouse when I was looking for something else entirely. Isn't that always the way! I thought the buttons went well with the fabric, I just shouldn't have use so many.

      Delete
  7. This is really impressive stuff, I don't think I would have the confidence to draft my own collar. I think the loads of buttons idea is great - no gappy bits to worry about - perfect!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for reading my blog! I love reading your comments, so please feel free to leave a comment if you have the time :) Lynne.