Sunday, 27 December 2015

Why I'm going to frog this jumper

I hope everybody had a nice christmas, or whatever you do at this time of year.  Personally I like to use my time to do all the crafting!  I finished a dress yesterday, and made an effort to do some knitting.  According to Ravelry, I cast on my Chuck jumper  on 14th January this year; the yarn is Cascade 220, the colour is Burgundy.  It stalled completely in about February/March with one sleeve and the neckband to do.  There was a reason for this.

 

I was taught to knit using the "throwing" method, where you hold the working yarn in your right hand, and use your thumb and first finger to wrap the yarn around the needles.  Now, this is an easy way to learn, but turns out to be pretty sore on the arms after a while!  My mum-in-law always boggled when she saw me knitting and showed me her way, which is tensioning the yarn around the fingers on the left hand - this is how I hold my yarn when I'm crocheting.  I just about managed the knit stitch, but couldn't get the hang of purling at all.

Then in March, when I was visiting my friend in England, friend's mum was knitting and tensioning the yarn around the fingers on her right hand.  Well, the scales fell from my eyes people!  This made perfect sense!  I tried it out on a sock I'd brought with me, and it was easy peasy.  So much easier on the arms, and smaller and neater stitches - which left me with a problem.  My basic sock pattern had to be re-worked to get the right fit, but that has been done and new socks have been made.

The bigger problem was my Chuck jumper (I just can't bring myself to call it a sweater!).  With my new knitting technique, my gauge would be different, therefore the second sleeve would be the wrong size.  About two weeks' ago I swatched with different sized needles, and got the gauge I wanted.  After three attempts - all because I had lost the ability to count - I got the sleeve head finished, but now I'm going to frog it. 

 

It's not too apparent in these photos, but in real life I can see a big difference between the new and old sleeves, and I'm not happy with the looseness of the stitches on the cable on the front.  I left it aside to mull it over, and cast on a sock, and now I know I'll be much happier with it if I start it again.  The yarn and the pattern are too lovely, and I know I'll not be happy with it the way it is now.  

So wish me luck!  I'll need to soak the yarn to get the creases out, but I'm pretty excited about starting this again.

I'll leave you with a photo of the sock I'm working on.  The pattern is called Lace And Cable Socks and is from a book called Socks From The Toe-Up by Wendy D Johnson.  Trust me to pick the pattern with three separate charts to follow!

 

Lynne

17 comments:

  1. Good luck knitting the sweater again. I have frogged a sweater knit in the same yarn and the creases soak out easily! I like your sock yarn, very pretty!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! It's good to know that the creases will come out. I think I'll frog it once I've finished my sock.

      Delete
  2. Yay! Here's to perfection - good for you :-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh no, such a shame when you've come so far. I had a similar problem with my Peggy Sue cardigan, I put it down for a couple of months and my tension must have been different when I started again. There's a noticeable line across the front, I just wear it around the house now!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Every time I look at my jumper I like it less, so I know it's the right thing to do. That's a shame about your cardigan. I didn't realise that tension could change so much.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Oh dear. At least by sharing others will learn from it, inclusive myself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I always think that if I've learnt something, then it's not a waste of time!

      Delete
  6. I know from experience that it must be a bit painful thinking of frogging it, but it sounds like the right thing to do - it would be more of a waste to carry on and end up with a jumper you're not happy with. Good luck with starting again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! You are definately right, I wouldn't have been happy with the finished jumper if I'd kept going, and I'm excited about starting it again.

      Delete
  7. I don't think I could bear to frog back something I'd come so far with but it sounds like you'd never be happy with it if you didn't - good on you Lynne and best of luck with it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Once I'd decided to frog, it wasn't too hard to do, and I found it quite liberating! I frogged it on Monday night because I was too tired to concentrate on anything else, and it took no time at all. Now I need to soak the yarn to get the crinkles out.

      Delete
  8. I have no idea what frogging is Lynne but it sounds deadly serious. Your sock are fab though. Happy New Year

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol! It just means unravelling all the stitches. It's a pity we can't do that with fabric! Happy new year to you too!

      Delete
  9. I am still "throwing" (after 35 years)... And I currently have two (!) jumpers to frog. You have my symphaties, but I am still envious that you managed to teach yourself how to knit the "proper" way! Huzzah ;)
    Happy New Year!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's probably how long I was throwing too! I couldn't believe how easy it was to change though. It just clicked with me when I watched friend's mum doing it.I think it helped that I hold my yarn in a similar way when I crochet.

      Delete
  10. I started as a thrower because that's why my granny taught me. When I started knitting again I discovered the continental style, but it's true that my tension is different. Lately I've been having some tension issues that I hope to fix soon.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for reading my blog! I love reading your comments, so please feel free to leave a comment if you have the time :) Lynne.